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Broomfield Bikes free repair events draw large crowds

Broomfield Bikes partnered with TREK Bike Shop to provide no-cost basic maintenance promotions from 5-7 p.m. on Monday by the Broomfield Library and on Thursday at McKay Bike Park.

Following a large turnout on Monday, Broomfield Bikes held a second free repair event on Thursday that attracted another horde of riders with equipment servicing needs.

Broomfield Bikes partnered with TREK Bike Shop to provide no-cost basic maintenance promotions from 5-7 p.m. on Monday by the Broomfield Library and on Thursday at McKay Bike Park.

“On Monday, we had close to 60 people show up,” organizer John Hubbard said. “I got there and people were already lined up.” 

Broomfield Bikes is a grassroots organization, which Hubbard said promotes trails and pathways, clean air, safe streets and transportation equality for riders. 

Social media outreach for Monday’s event, with professional bicycle mechanics on hand to fix flat tires, faulty brakes or balance wheels proved popular, according to Hubbard.

“The word got out and we were a little overwhelmed,” he said. “We were under-stocked with the supplies we brought.”

Despite planning to wrap up a bit earlier, due to the capacity crowd bike repairs on Monday concluded around 11 p.m. 

“We had to get some lights going so that we can work after dark,” he said. “I didn't feel right turning people away.”

Denver resident Nicole Jaech caught wind of Monday's event on Facebook but made the trip on Thursday after confusing dates.

“I drove up here on Tuesday thinking that the event was on Tuesday but it was on Monday,” she said. 

Regardless of the mistake, Jaech was happy to take advantage of the cost savings only days later.

“I have had a problem getting my bikes fixed because it cost so much money,” she said.

Jaech brought a pair of decade old rides to McKay Bike Park, both of which had never been tuned up.

“The wheel wouldn’t turn and the bike tires were always flat,” she said. “I couldn't figure out how to change them myself because I’d never learned how.”

Despite the distance, Jaech was willing to make the trek, even though it took two trips.

“If I want to keep using it I've got to take care of it,” she said.

Thornton resident Juan Serrato, who is new to riding, stopped by to have a recently acquired mountain bike checked over.

“I bought it two weeks ago from a neighbor who was moving out of state,” he said. “It’s just not shifting properly and making some kind of noise.”

Once his ride is fully operational, Serrato hopes to incorporate bicycling into his workout routine to compensate for a bad knee.

Broomfield resident Aaron Lingensnith returned on Thursday after failing to navigate the line on Monday.

“On Monday we ended up leaving because the line was so long and we actually had another commitment,” he said.

Regardless of earlier time constraints, Lingensnith was happy to return on Thursday.  

“I’m here because I know so little about bikes,” he said.

Despite failing to get bike service on Monday, while waiting in line Lingensnith had a revelation.

“There's clearly a need and a desire for the community to have this bike support,” he said. “Maybe this is something that Broomfield can take the reins locally in the summer.”

Hubbard said the bike repair gatherings are part of Broomfield Bikes goal of promoting transportation equity. 

“It levels the playing field a little bit so people don't have to fork up so much money just to get around town,” he said.